Archive for February, 2015

Gray’s Desert Parsley “Lomatium grayi”

Thursday, February 26th, 2015

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Gray’s Desert Parsley “Lomatium grayi” Parsley Family (Apiaceae). Perennial, plant 8-15″ tall, leaves resemble parsley, flowers bright yellow clusters in an umbel, aromatic but not entirely pleasant. Blooms in early spring in dry rocky soil in Eastern OR & WA.  Photo: Catherine Creek near Lyle, WA. 3/31/2007

Grass Widow “Olsynium douglasii var douglasii”

Wednesday, February 25th, 2015

Grass Widow “Olsynium douglasii var douglasii”, Iris Family (Iridaceae). Perennial, plants 6-12″ tall, flowers lavender, occasionally magenta or white,  3/4-1″ diameter, blooms in early spring in moist open areas that dry out in summer.    Widespread in the Pacific Northwest with the exception of N.W. OR. and S.W. WA.   Photo: Catherine Creek near Lyle, WA. 3/13/2007

Indian Plum “Oemleria cerasformis”

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

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Indian Plum “Oemleria cerasformis” Rose Family (Rosaceae).  Perennial, shrub 3-15′ tall, plants have either male flowers or female flowers, flowers greenish white or white, fragrant but somewhat skunky, male plants have stamens, female plants have flowers with pistils and produce  edible plum colored berries.  Blooms in early spring along forest edges from the Cascade Mts. to the coast in Or & Wa.  Photo:  Rainier, Or. 3/13/2010

Munson Creek Falls

Monday, February 23rd, 2015

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Munson Creek Falls  This is the highest waterfall in the Coast Range and it is 266 feet high.  It is located about 7 miles South of Tillamook. Turn East at the sign and proceed 1.6 miles to the parking lot.  There is an easy 0.5 mile trail to the falls.  Photo: 1/24/2005

Hooker’s Indian Pink “Silene hookeri”

Sunday, February 22nd, 2015

Hooker’s Indian Pink “Silene hookeri” Pink Family (Caryophyllacea). Perennial, 2-8″ in tall, approx 1 t0 1.5 inch flowers pink, red, salmon or white. Found West of the Cascade Mts. primarily in the Siskiyous of S.E. OR.  Photo: Along the Little River near Glide, OR. 4/17/2010

Sea Blush “Plectritis congesta”

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Sea Blush “Plectritis congesta” Valerian Family (Valerianaceae).  Annual, plant, 6-20″ tall, pink flowers but occasionally white , grows in wet areas, Cascade Mts. to the coast.  Photo: Catherine Creek near Lyle, Wa. in the Columbia River Gorge  3/30/2007

Redhead “Aythya americana”

Thursday, February 19th, 2015

Redhead “Aythya americana”  Length 19″, wingspan 29″ and weight 2.3 pounds.  The males have blue bills during the breeding season. Photo: Malheur National Wildlife Refuge south of Burns, OR 5/29/2010

Peggy the Train

Wednesday, February 18th, 2015

Peggy is a “shay”  and was built in 1909 by the Lima Locomotive Works in Lima, Ohio.   She was shipped around Cape Horn and unloaded in Seattle.  She worked in the woods in the Pacific Northwest and retired in 1950.  Notice the absence of the large horizontal cylinders.  Shays had two or three small vertical cylinders and were better adapted for use in the woods.  When my dad was a boy he used to watch the shays push a string of cars loaded with logs across the high trestles and then a shay on the other side would hook up to the cars to pull them on across.  Photo:  Forestry Center in Portland, Or 10/20/2009

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Killdeer “Charadrius vociferus”

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015

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Killdeer “Charadrius vociferus”  Length 10″, wing span 24”, weight 3 ounces.  The two dark bands across the breast are the unique identifying characteristic.  These birds lay their eggs in gravel and perform a “broken wing” display to lead potential predators away from their nest.  Photo: Near Burn’s, Or 7/02/2009

Gray Wolf “Canis lupus”

Monday, February 16th, 2015

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Gray Wolf “Canis lupus”  Length about 4.5′ long, tail 1′ long, weight 60-100 lbs. Wolves were originally wide spread in Western Or. and in N. E. Or. but they were completely eradicated about 75 years ago. Photo:  Northwest Trek near Eatonville, Wa. 11/05/2006